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#1 Fireweed Trekker

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 09:28 AM

Yes I do enjoy hot coffee...however when time is tight and I want to be done with it and on my way I'll settle for a cup of lukewarm coffee.

What I'm looking at is the difference between being lukewarm as described in Rev 3:4 - 22 the Laodicean church and the difference in being content in whatever Heb 13:5 and Phil 4:11 - 13.

 

I think being lukewarm toward Christ is not the way to live out our faith, a form of contentedness that isn't Scriptural.

 

A couple of years ago I had a major operation and since then I haven't been able attend Sunday services (I've been to church three times on Sunday) because of "needs of the business" be it security or retail industry. Throw in car expenses which makes me disinclined to own a car. Low wages and lower energy level (health wise) to meet commitments.

 

Going back to school will entail debt for living expenses and tuition, I look at the state of our economy and say no thanks to holding that dubious bag of question marks.

 

So I'm trying to understand the difference between lukewarm and as Paul describes being content in all things.


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#2 ADVRider

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 04:53 PM

Maybe the short answer is, being lukewarm describes the state of a person's heart towards God and the faith. Being content describes the state of a person who is content to live with varying life circumstances. One is a sinful condition (lukewarm, indifferent towards God), whereas the second one is a virtue (trusting God in all circumstances). So as a description, a person could find themselves poor materially but still very much on fire for God. Interestingly, the charge against the Laodicean church was just the opposite. They were quite materially comfortable, but they were not so interested in God.


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#3 Candice

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 09:33 PM

Great topic!!!

 

This is a verse that I've been seeking as of late, and the Lord has provided an alternative to what is the widely held belief about this verse.  It seems that I've developed a bad taste in my mouth (personally) from performance-based Christianity which seems to provide the grace to be saved, but one must continue in works to be sanctified and one can be more acceptable to God by those works.  This seems like a statement no one would actually admit to believing.  It maybe subconscious, but truly practiced by many.  To me, this is simply fruit of the Spirit or works of the flesh.  I believe that the key to this verse may well be "the mixture".

 

Here's an article I like on the topic.  Of course, we can all go to the Lord and ask Him and seek His interpretation of His own Son's words.  Hope you find it interesting and maybe it furthers your truth-seeking as a Jesus follower. Personally, I've had to face the disappointment that most of today's churches are bent towards purpose-driven mind sets instead of spirit-led.

 

“Lukewarm Christianity” has nothing to do with being zealous!

Far too often we associate with being neither “hot nor cold” as being pew warmers. It is not. Paul takes us to the church in Laodicea and shocks us with the most clearest commentary on this subject I have ever read. Enjoy:

 

“The letter to the Laodicean church may be the best known of the seven Revelations letters. But it is also the most troubling letter for many Christians. The difficulty stems from the rebuke spoken by Jesus: “I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either one or the other! So, because you are lukewarm—neither hot nor cold—I am about to spit you out of my mouth. You say, ‘I am rich; I have acquired wealth and do not need a thing.’ But you do not realize that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked.” (Rev 3:15-17)

 

What does it mean to say a church is lukewarm? What does it mean to be spit out of Jesus’ mouth? What does it mean to be wretched and pitiful, blind and naked? In this series I will look at each of these questions in turn.

What does it mean to be lukewarm? Many commentators define lukewarmness in terms of apathy or lack of zeal. They say it’s better to be on fire for God or coldly opposed to him than be half-hearted in the middle. This interpretation has become so widely known that even among sinners the term lukewarm has become synonymous with apathy and complacency.
But there are at least three problems with interpreting this scripture in terms of zeal.

 

Problem 1: Zeal is a subjective term

What is hot to you will be lukewarm to someone else. You might think that you are “on fire” for God. You may say, “I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I have.” Then you meet someone who is fasting four times a week and giving 20% away. Compared to them you look like a casual believer. After all, you’re only doing half as much as them. You begin to wonder, “Am I doing enough? Will Jesus spit me out?”

I’ve heard preachers use Revelations 3:16 to condemn Christians who have become, in their eyes, complacent and lackadaisical. It’s funny, but when preachers say this, they usually define “hot” in terms of whatever level of zeal they happen to be living at. It’s an amazing coincidence. No matter how zealous or enthusiastic you may be, there will always be someone more zealous who makes you look lukewarm by comparison. The only appropriate response is one of competitive insecurity. And that leads to the second problem with this interpretation.

 

Problem 2: Zeal implies God’s acceptance of us is based on our performance
The lukewarmness of the Laodicean had put them in danger of being “spit out” or rejected by the Lord. This begs the question, what makes us acceptable to God? Is it our zeal?  Usually when people preach on this text, zeal is defined in terms of things we should do, or rather things we aren’t doing enough of. And we sit there and nod our heads because, yes, we could be doing a lot more of all those good things. But think about this for a second. Since when did we buy into the idea that our performance makes us acceptable to God? This is just self-righteousness in disguise. You can tell that by looking at the fruit. What if you did fast twice a week and give 10% away and then you met a believer who didn’t fast or tithe at all? Pride would swell up inside. You might think, “I’m no Billy Graham, but compared to this person I’m hot, hot, hot!”

Yeah, that impresses God.

 

Religion deals in relatives and leads people to say, “I’m basically a good person,” or, “I may not be perfect, but I’m above average.” But God deals in absolutes. You’re either in the kingdom or you’re not. You’re either a sheep or a goat, wheat or weeds, a sinner or a saint. Defining lukewarmness in terms of our performance gets people thinking that there is some middle ground when it comes to our acceptance. But there is no middle ground.

 

Problem 3: Jesus says we’re better off cold
Most people agree that it’s better to be hot than lukewarm, but Jesus said it’s also better to be cold. Either hot or cold is good. But if Jesus was referring to enthusiasm, why would he say it’s better to have none that some? If Jesus was referring to the things we do for him, why would he say it’s better to do nothing than something? This doesn’t make any sense.
Some have defined “cold” as meaning “being opposed to God” or “rejecting the truth outright.” If so, why would Jesus say, “I wish you were hot or cold”? Why would Jesus want anyone to reject the truth of the gospel? That doesn’t make sense either.

 

Lukewarmness is not about human zeal.  People who preach zeal are essentially saying, “be good for Jesus.” Well it’s good to be good but our goodness never makes us acceptable to a holy and perfect God. Apart from him we are all tarnished by sin, we are all unworthy. Most believers accept that God’s grace makes the sinner righteous, yet they don’t believe his grace also makes the Christian righteous! It’s as if God helps the sinner all the way to the cross and then leaves the new Christian to make it the rest of the way on his own. This dumb idea has been floating around since the time of the Galatians:
“You foolish Galatians! Who has bewitched you? Before your very eyes Jesus Christ was clearly portrayed as crucified. I would like to learn just one thing from you: Did you receive the Spirit by observing the law, or by believing what you heard? Are you so foolish? After beginning with the Spirit, are you now trying to attain your goal by human effort?” (Gal 3:1-3)

 

The Message Bible translates the last verse this way:
“Only crazy people would think they could complete by their own efforts what was begun by God.” (Gal 3:3)

 

The Contemporary English Version puts it like this, “How can you be so stupid?” while Darby’s translation wonders, “Are ye so senseless?”

 

So there you have it. The Bible says those who preach human effort are crazy, foolish, stupid and senseless. Whether we are saved or unsaved, our self-righteous acts can never make us acceptable to God.
You might say, “It’s not about works, it’s about attitude. God looks at the heart.” But Jesus did not say to the Laodiceans, “I know your heart.” He said, “I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot.” There was clearly something they were doing that made them lukewarm and unacceptable. So what was it?

 

Lukewarmness is about mixing stuff
When Jesus says he would prefer that we are hot or cold rather than lukewarm, most people automatically think of a thermometer: cold and hot temperatures are good, but being stuck in the middle is bad. As we have seen this is a poor metaphor because there is no middle ground with God. But lukewarmness can also refer to mixing things. When you mix cold with hot you get lukewarm.

Now what are two good things in the Bible that, if you mix them together, you end up with something bad? Here’s a hint – what were the Galatians mixing together? Answer: law and grace.

 

We all know that the grace of God is good, but what about the law?
“The law is holy, and the commandment is holy, righteous and good.” (Rom 7:12)
Why is the law good? Because it leads us to Christ that we might be justified by faith (Gal 3:24). The law was written on tablets of cold stone. The law has no power to make you righteous and good, but if you are honest, it will reveal your need for a Savior:

“Did that which is good, then, become death to me? By no means! But in order that sin might be recognized as sin, it produced death in me through what was good, so that through the commandment sin might become utterly sinful.” (Rom 7:13)

 

The law – which is good – brings despair, condemnation and guilt, and leads us to Christ. God’s grace – which is very good – brings hope, justification and freedom through Jesus Christ. But these two good things cannot be mixed together. If you try to mix law with grace you’ll end up with the benefits of neither.

How do you dilute the power of the law? By lowering God’s holy standards to attainable levels of human performance.

How do you negate the unmerited favor of God? By trying to earn it through observing the commandments and other acts self-righteousness.

 

The Laodicean’s problem was not that they were complacent, but that they were trying to attain through human effort that which only God can do. Their problem was far more serious than a poor attitude. They were trying to make themselves righteous.

Good and bad zeal
It is good to be enthusiastic for Jesus. But there is good zeal and bad zeal. Look at what Paul said of the Jews:
“For I can testify about them that they are zealous for God, but their zeal is not based on knowledge. Since they did not know the righteousness that comes from God and sought to establish their own, they did not submit to God’s righteousness. Christ is the end of the law so that there may be righteousness for everyone who believes.” (Rms 10:2-4)

Bad zeal is what you get when you try to establish your own righteousness instead of submitting to God’s righteousness. Good zeal is what you get when you know that Christ has set you free from the demands of the law and given you his righteousness. When you apprehend what Jesus has done for you, you will be as enthusiastic as a freed prisoner! You will run like a cripple with new legs, like a blind man with new eyes!

 

Jesus did not suffer and die on the cross to give us a chance to compete for God’s approval. He died to make us righteous. If Christians are apathetic today it’s probably because they’re tired of trying to stir up carnal zeal. They are weary of being told they are not praying enough, reading enough, witnessing enough, giving enough. No matter how much they do, it is never enough. The unfinished work of the law always demands more.

 

What will set Christians free is the revelation that Jesus has done it all. His was a one-time sacrifice for all the sins of the world. Not only did Jesus die for us but he lives for us, he keeps us, and he intercedes for us. As you begin to understand the significance this, it will set you free like never before.”

 

Be blessed.


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#4 Charles Miles

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 09:24 AM

Candice, What a wonderful post about what Jesus did for us and what response we are to have to His actions. You hit the ball out of the park in the last paragraph! We are indeed made righteous, not by what we have done or what we will do, but by what Christ did once, for all. We may do good things and we should do good things, but all those things should be done out of the love(agape) shown to us by our Lord. We don`t do good things to get accepted, we do them BECAUSE we have been loved and accepted....as we are. Jesus only gave us one commandment..."Love one another even as I have loved you". This kind of love comes from our Heavenly Father, and certainly could never be considered
"lukewarm".

Praise God for who He is,

Charlie
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#5 Fireweed Trekker

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 09:43 AM

Great answers by all! Thank you! Time to pull this apart and understand what makes it tick.


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#6 radar

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Posted 13 December 2015 - 06:43 AM

I agree with Charles. Candice that is a great answer, and for the Trekker, a good question!


"Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven."


#7 jrtxun

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Posted 13 December 2015 - 08:17 PM

I was brought here as this passage is something I became very curious about while reading it the other night. Candice, your answer is very well thought out and raises some good points. I've always wondered myself why it says he'd rather we be cold. However, I do believe this passage is speaking of zeal to some extent. Simply because in verse 20 he says "be diligent and turn from your indifference (NLT) or "be zealous and repent" (NASB). The way I interpret the whole passage is that the church has become materially comfortable and since they are blessed lost their hunger and thirst for the things of the Lord. When he tells them to buy gold and garments from him it reminds me of when he tells the woman at the well “If you only knew the gift God has for you and who you are speaking to, you would ask me, and I would give you living water.”

I don't normally comment on these things and I'm not looking to start an argument, I just wanted to point those things out. Nothing Candice said is incorrect, I just don't think it's really what this passage is about. The verse "you are neither hot nor cold. I wish that you were one or the other" is still a mystery to me.

To Trekker, you hit it on the head when you said being lukewarm is a form of contentedness that isn't scriptural, a spiritual indifference. Paul talks of learning to live with plenty and learning to live with little... People don't want to hear it nowadays but Scripture has much to say about our material state. That is where contentment comes in.

#8 Candice

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 08:32 PM

jrtxun....

 

Yes, I see your point.  But, I guess I wonder then why Jesus would not specifically define, as is provided in the law and all commandments, the definition of zealous, content, indifference.  We have to know how and where to draw the line.   But, I agree that we can be materialistic and content and be less than spiritual because we have no relationship with God..

 

One time several years ago, a pastor kept saying, "If you don't share the Gospel on a regular and consistent basis, you're not saved."  I asked how often was enough and at what interval.  I mean, it's only fair. Where does it say that in Scripture.  Of course, there isn't any such thing.  So, defining such a commandment would be required for God to be just and fair.

 

I guess it's a matter of not being owned by material possessions; but just simply owning them.  Abraham was wealthy; Joseph (a shadow of Christ) was wealthy; David was wealthy; Solomon was wealthy; many others as well. But, they had a relationship with the Lord and were justified by Faith.  This is the difference I believe. 

 

So, I think that the woman at the well: Jesus went out of His way to talk with her.  He showed great love towards her.  I wonder if most of us would do the same?  I wonder if I would do the same!



#9 jrtxun

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Posted 15 December 2015 - 07:03 PM

Yep, and when we start trying to define how much is enough we loose the whole point. But I think here in this passage the church is so indifferent it is obvious. Jesus wasn't making blanket statements or giving a discourse on zeal, he was speaking to a specific church with a specific problem (and He still does the same today if we'll listen). He also says in verse 20 (I meant 19 on above post, this ones 20 I promise) that he is at the door knocking. To me that is a very sad verse that Jesus is outside his own church knocking to be let in. It shows the severity of their indifference.

#10 Fireweed Trekker

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 04:57 PM

Affluence leading to apathy in the heart...no particular length of time getting there...proverbial frog in water - raise and lower the water temperature till cooked. This last part is why we need the Holy Spirit as our counselor.

 

Deuteronomy 8:10 - 18

10 When you have eaten and are satisfied, praise the Lord your God for the good land he has given you. 11 Be careful that you do not forget the Lord your God, failing to observe his commands, his laws and his decrees that I am giving you this day. 12 Otherwise, when you eat and are satisfied, when you build fine houses and settle down, 13 and when your herds and flocks grow large and your silver and gold increase and all you have is multiplied, 14 then your heart will become proud and you will forget the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery. 15 He led you through the vast and dreadful wilderness, that thirsty and waterless land, with its venomous snakes and scorpions. He brought you water out of hard rock. 16 He gave you manna to eat in the wilderness, something your ancestors had never known, to humble and test you so that in the end it might go well with you. 17 You may say to yourself, “My power and the strength of my hands have produced this wealth for me.” 18 But remember the Lord your God, for it is he who gives you the ability to produce wealth, and so confirms his covenant, which he swore to your ancestors, as it is today.

 

https://www.biblegat...y 8&version=NIV

 

Any thoughts?


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#11 jrtxun

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 06:30 AM

Yep, very good passage. I've never really noticed that last line that when we do succeed it is confirmation of his covenant to Abraham.

We actually talked about Revelation 3 in church last night, and I think the pastor had some good insights. It is very much about mixing like Candice said, but not about mixing grace and the law but rather Christ and the world. To be lukewarm is to mix the two or be a worldly Christian. This makes him sick as it creates a stumbling block for others. That is why he can say he'd rather they be cold. It makes sense also on his call to turn from indifference and other verses there. When he says they think they are rich but are really poor he is saying "you say you are one thing but are another".

Taking it back to your original post, it's not about how many services you attend but or some scale of how much a Christian does, but a question of character and integrity... In a structural sense almost, if that makes sense. It's the call to be in the world but not of it. I could go on but that's the main points I got from last night.

#12 Charles Miles

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 09:08 AM

Reading down this thread, I find that man`s definitions sometimes get confusing.  I don`t really know how to determine if someone   is "lukewarm", but I can tell when I get that way.  Looking into one`s own heart honestly and prayerfully, one can almost immediately see the truth about our relationship with the Father.  Either the relationship is close and very personal, or not.  To me, the lukewarm Christian has lost focus with his/her relationship, losing the very personal, close, precious nature of it.  This would not mean a loss of salvation, but one`s walk with the Lord is not hand in hand or arm in arm, but merely recognizing that walking with the Lord is something we do on occasion.  Maybe a more accurate picture would be like a man who was hungry walking into a  large grocery store with fresh food and good smells, then just not getting food, although it is free! All the good things of the kingdom available....free, and not taking advantage of them! Sad. 



#13 ADVRider

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 03:33 PM

Just found out recently that a friend who is a former schoolmate co-produced the movie, War Room. Cool stuff, haven't seen the movie though.



#14 Fireweed Trekker

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:44 AM

While pondering Law and Grace, I find myself wanting to stay busy in the Works and daily activity of day to day living. Like that will change anything...

Slow down, pull up to the campfire and have a cup of coffee, get your bearings young pilgrim.


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#15 Dina

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 11:06 AM

This thread is a blessing.  I do think you have to be careful how you define "zeal," however. I guess there is human zeal and godly zeal.  I think of godly zeal as an active love toward God, in response to God's love for us, that we would do anything God wanted/led us to do, in his Spirit's power, of course!  I liked this:

 

Christian zeal is not loud and noisy, but humbly grows in faithfulness. 2 Peter 1:5-8, NKJV. “But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love."

 

Dina



#16 Jesus_Lolly

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 06:27 AM

Candice’s words opened up a whole can of (spiritual) worms for me. I think she hit on an important point—one that is especially relevant for our time.

 

For instance, I was reading about the magi this morning, and I wondered why their offerings were acceptable before the Lord (see Mt. 2:11).  Certainly, I do believe that their treasures of gold, frankincense, and myrrh were welcome even though they were most likely pagans.

 

Still, not all offerings were presentable. The Holy Spirit rejected the monies presented by Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1-11). The reason being, their offering was incomplete.  Also, according to Jesus, the church in Sardis had incomplete offerings. (Rev. 3:1). 

 

On the other hand, God valued the offerings of Cornelius the centurion—his offerings were seen as a memorial before the Lord (Acts 10:4). However, to Peter, eating with the Gentiles was akin to eating reptiles and other unclean things (Acts 10:12), but God had cleansed them.  Thus, the magi and a Roman centurion presented holy offerings, while some of the early “Christians” and churches did not.

 

 Consider the fact that even the Lord had to reach a certain age, and had to fulfill a particular role, before his death and resurrection would be acceptable before God. Otherwise, it would not have mattered that Herod had sought to kill Him, for Jesus came to die (2:13).  Nevertheless, that begs the question, why did Jesus have to be a particular age at his death?  Certainly, lambs offered as sacrifices fulfilled a purpose merely by being substitutes for the sinful.

 

In a way, thinking about this is kind of creepy to me, and I feel as if I am interjecting unclean things. However, I feel that it is important because Jesus was adamant about pointing out to the churches that our conduct and posture matters. Furthermore, I think it can all be traced to how we approach God. God is holy, and we must present all offerings with that understanding in mind.

 

Thus, I agree that Candice’s interpretation of lukewarmness has an accurate dimension. I think Scripture clearly points to how incompleteness or irreverence, is unacceptable to God. This is important to consider because our day is not unlike the time when the apostles ministered. In fact, the Romans didn’t care what persons worshiped as long as there were no claims of exclusivity. However, only exclusivity brings God honor, and only exclusivity is without mixture. Only exclusivity bans tepid offerings of anything and everything and worldliness. Certainly, worldliness does not have to be blatant to be an addition of something “else.”

 

By the way, I am not intimating that the magi or Cornelius were saved apart from Christ. I am merely considering that pagans find their way to God when they earnestly seek Him. On the other hand, persons who claim to follow Christ, might not necessarily be approaching God in the right manner.



#17 Tkulp

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 11:47 AM

If any of you are still thinking about this you might find it interesting to see what the Bible ‘might’ have to say on the subject. (With Strong’s and Dictionary definitions.)

Is it possible that the hot and cold may refer to those who have relationship, wisdom, understanding, intimacy and those that are cold are lack all of the above because they have never heard, fresh without the confusion of those that believe they have the light but are really living in a murky spiritual life, because they are half full of the world. The double-minded!

All through the Gospels Jesus talks about plants and people and their fruits. Fruit is the natural product of a plant in order to bring about possible food and possible reproduction. Fruit in nature is not something that a plant thinks about producing, it just happens! Might not that be the deeds that Jesus is referring to in the Revelation?

Rev 3:15-19 ‘I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either cold or hot! So because you are lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I am going to vomit you out of my mouth! Because you say, “I am rich and have acquired great wealth, and need nothing,” but do not realize that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind, and naked, take my advice and buy gold from me refined by fire so you can become rich!

Buy from me white clothing so you can be clothed and your shameful nakedness will not be exposed, and buy eye salve to put on your eyes so you can see! All those I love, I rebuke and discipline. So be earnest and repent!

They needed to be healed from their blindness(darkness cloudiness), etc. in order to see - Get light(understanding, revelation, etc) so that you do not walk in darkness... the verses are at the end.


Mat 25:1-25 “.....The foolish ones said to the wise, ‘Give us some of your oil, because our lamps are going out.’ ‘No,’ they replied. ‘There won’t be enough for you and for us. Go instead to those who sell oil and buy some for yourselves.’ But while they had gone to buy it, the bridegroom arrived, and those who were ready went inside with him to the wedding banquet. Then the door was shut.

 Later, the other virgins came too, saying, ‘Lord, lord! Let us in!’ But he replied, ‘I tell you the truth, I do not know you!’.....”

Buy (Strong’s) “properly to go to market, that is, (by implication) to purchase; specifically to redeem:”


Hebrews 11:6  But without (living dependence, that runs to Him(God) for every need) it is impossible  (to gratify Him entirely): for he that cometh to God must (entrust - Put into the care or protection of someone) that he is, and that he is a (remunerator - A person who pays money for something)of them that (to search out, that is, investigate, crave, demand...) him. [Strong’s, dictionary, KJ Bible]


Mat 15:22 - 28  And behold, a woman who was a Canaanite from that district came out and, with a [loud, troublesomely urgent] cry, begged, Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David! My daughter is miserably and distressingly and cruelly possessed by a demon!
But He did not answer her a word. And His disciples came and implored Him, saying, Send her away, for she is crying out after us. He answered, I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.
But she came and, kneeling, worshiped Him and kept praying, Lord, help me!
And He answered, It is not right (proper, becoming, or fair) to take the children’s bread and throw it to the little dogs. She said, Yes, Lord, yet even the little pups (little whelps) eat the crumbs that fall from their [young] masters’ table.
Then Jesus answered her, O woman, great is your faith! Be it done for you as you wish. And her daughter was cured from that moment.

Mat 8:13  As Jesus went into Capernaum, a centurion came up to Him, begging Him, And saying, Lord, my servant boy is lying at the house paralyzed and distressed with intense pains.
And Jesus said to him, I will come and restore him.
But the centurion replied to Him, Lord, I am not worthy or fit to have You come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant boy will be cured. For I also am a man subject to authority, with soldiers subject to me. And I say to one, Go, and he goes; and to another, Come, and he comes; and to my slave, Do this, and he does it.
When Jesus heard him, He marveled and said to those who followed Him [who adhered steadfastly to Him, conforming to His example in living and, if need be, in dying also], I tell you truly, I have not found so much faith as this with anyone, even in Israel.
I tell you, many will come from east and west, and will sit at table with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, While the sons and heirs of the kingdom will be driven out into the darkness outside, where there will be weeping and grinding of teeth. [Psa. 107:2-3; Isa. 49:12; Isa. 59:19; Mal. 1:11]
Then to the centurion Jesus said, Go; it shall be done for you as you have believed. And the servant boy was restored to health at that very moment.

Mar 6:1-6  JESUS WENT away from there and came to His [own] country and hometown [Nazareth], and His disciples followed [with] Him. And on the Sabbath He began to teach in the synagogue; and many who listened to Him were utterly astonished, saying, Where did this Man acquire all this? What is the wisdom [the broad and full intelligence which has been] given to Him? What mighty works and exhibitions of power are wrought by His hands! Is not this the Carpenter, the son of Mary and the brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon? And are not His sisters here among us? And they took offense at Him and were hurt [that is, they disapproved of Him, and it hindered them from acknowledging His authority] and they were caused to stumble and fall.
But Jesus said to them, A prophet is not without honor (deference, reverence) except in his [own] country and among [his] relatives and in his [own] house.
And He was not able to do even one work of power there, except that He laid His hands on a few sickly people [and] cured them.
And He marveled because of their unbelief (their lack of faith in Him). And He went about among the surrounding villages and continued teaching.

Mat 6:19 - 29 Do not gather and heap up and store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust and worm consume and destroy, and where thieves break through and steal. But gather and heap up and store for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust nor worm consume and destroy, and where thieves do not break through and steal; For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

The eye is the lamp of the body. So if your eye is sound, your entire body will be full of light. But if your eye is unsound, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the very light in you... is darkened, how dense is that darkness!

No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will stand by and be devoted to the one and despise and be against the other. You cannot serve God and mammon (deceitful riches, money, possessions, or whatever is trusted in).

Therefore I tell you, stop being perpetually uneasy (anxious and worried) about your life, what you shall eat or what you shall drink; or about your body, what you shall put on. Is not life greater [in quality] than food, and the body [far above and more excellent] than clothing? Look at the birds of the air; they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father keeps feeding them. Are you not worth much more than they?

And who of you by worrying and being anxious can add one unit of measure (cubit) to his stature or to the span of his life? [Psa. 39:5-7] And why should you be anxious about clothes? Consider the lilies of the field and learn thoroughly how they grow; they neither toil nor spin. Yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his magnificence (excellence, dignity, and grace) was not arrayed like one of these. [1Ki. 10:4-7]

But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and green and tomorrow is tossed into the furnace, will He not much more surely clothe you, O you of little faith?

Therefore do not worry and be anxious, saying, What are we going to have to eat? or, What are we going to have to drink? or, What are we going to have to wear? For the Gentiles (heathen) wish for and crave and diligently seek all these things, and your heavenly Father knows well that you need them all.

But seek (aim at and strive after) first of all His kingdom and His righteousness (His way of doing and being right), and then all these things taken together will be given you besides.

So do not worry or be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will have worries and anxieties of its own. Sufficient for each day is its own trouble.


Luk 11:34, 35  Your eye is the lamp of your body. When your eye is healthy, your whole body is full of light, but when it is diseased, your body is full of darkness.

Therefore see to it that the light in you is not darkness.

 



#18 Tkulp

Tkulp

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 01:39 PM

As I have been meditating on the concept of lukewarm and coldness in Revelation 3:15,16, I felt like I needed to add a note to my previous comment, if nothing else, for posterity!

2 Peter 2:18-22, is a rather good description of the overall American Church, from where I am sitting.
Verse 21 is also an example of it being better to be cold, rather than lukewarm. “For it had been better for them not to have known the way of righteousness...”, cold; “than, after they have known it, to turn from the holy commandment delivered unto them.”, lukewarm!
The overwhelming church of America seems to want to water down the importance of obedience to the law, the Ten Commandments. They have turned from the “holy commandment”, even when Jesus said that keeping them was the way to eternal (Matthew 5:19,20; Matthew 19:17-19)

2 Peter 2:18-22 "For when they speak great swelling words of vanity, they allure through the lusts of the flesh, through much wantonness, those that were clean escaped from them who live in error. While they promise them liberty, they themselves are the servants of corruption: for of whom a man is overcome, of the same is he brought in bondage. For if after they have escaped the pollutions of the world through the knowledge of the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, they are again entangled therein, and overcome, the latter end is worse with them than the beginning.  For it had been better for them not to have known the way of righteousness, than, after they have known it, to turn from the holy commandment delivered unto them. But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire."
 


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