Jump to content






Photo
- - - - -

Hanukkah! Come, Light the Menorah!

Posted by Abraham Sandler , 12 December 2012 · 3778 views

Hanukkah! Come, Light the Menorah! Hanukkah means “Dedication” so it is called “The Feast of Dedication.” It is also called “The Feast of Lights.”

It refers to the time in history, when under the leadership of Judah Maccabee (Maccabee meaning, "hammer" or "sledgehammer" in recognition of his ferocity in battle) the Jewish people won their freedom from their Greek and Syrian oppressors. On the 25th of Kislev - December, 165 B.C., they cleansed and restored the Temple and rededicated it to God. Tradition tells us that only enough sacred oil for one day was found when they lit the Temple menorah. However, a great miracle happened there! The menorah (seven branched candle holder found in the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem) burned for eight days on one day’s supply of oil. So every year, beginning on the 25th of Kislev, Jewish families all over the world light candles for eight days to remember this holiday of our freedom and God's miracle.

The Temple had fallen into enemy hands. They desecrated and defiled it. They polluted it with idols and sacrifices to false gods. They stopped Temple life. The Syrian conquerors endeavored to stamp out Judaism and the Jewish people by forbidding the teaching of Torah, the Jewish Scriptures, and by not permitting circumcision; or allowing the observance of the Sabbath. To continue to teach the children their Jewish faith the game of dreidal was invented. A four-sided top with Hebrew letters on each side was used. When the soldiers were near they played the game, when the soldiers left they taught the children. The game of dreidal is still played during Hanukah.

Since oil is prominent in the story many foods are fried in oil during Hanukkah. One special food is latkes, potato or cheese pancakes, served with sour cream and applesauce for potato and jams and jellies for the cheese. Recipes to follow, below.

A nine branch menorah or candle holder is used. On the first day of Hanukkah, one candle is lit. On the second day two candles are lit, and so on until on the eighth day all eight are lit. The ninth candle is called the Shamos or “servant” candle. This is lit first and it gives its’ light to all the other candles. One explanation for lighting the candles this way is that the Shamos candle represents or symbolizes the Messiah and just as the Shamos gives physical light to the other candles so the Messiah gives spiritual light to his people. In Isaiah 53, the Messiah is called God's "Righteous servant." It is significant to note that Messiah Yeshua/Jesus observed this festival, also known as "The feast of Dedication" John 10:22-23. Yeshua also said, "I am the light of the world. He that follows me shall not walk in darkness but shall have the light of life" John 8:12.

We light the Shamos first, then say the blessing, then light the Hanukkah candles. Presents are given to the children each night. Usually money, dreidals (four sided tops), and candy are given, songs are sung, games are played, especially the dreidal game, and latkes are eaten.

The Jews under the leadership of the Maccabees were led to victory and recovered the Temple of God. It was Redeemed from their enemies. Then it was cleansed and Restored. After which it was Rededicated to God. The light of the Temple was Renewed, and Temple life was Revived.

God wants to redeem us, restore us, rededicate us, renew us, and revive us, to nourish us, and restore us to life, spiritual life. He wants us to be whole, vigorous, and lively. We are admonished to walk in the Spirit and to walk in the Light, Galatians 5:16, 25; 1 John 1:7. Let us seek God and we will find Him when we seek God with all of our heart.

This Hanukah let us pray that all Israel will see that Yeshua is the Messiah and the Light of the world.
Hanukkah means “Dedication” so it is called “The Feast of Dedication.” It is also called “The Feast of Lights.”
It refers to the time in history, when under the leadership of Judah Maccabee (Maccabee meaning, "hammer" or "sledgehammer" in recognition of his ferocity in battle) the Jewish people won their freedom from their Greek and Syrian oppressors. On the 25th of Kislev - December, 165 B.C., they cleansed and restored the Temple and rededicated it to God. Tradition tells us that only enough sacred oil for one day was found when they lit the Temple menorah. However, a great miracle happened there! The menorah (seven branched candle holder found in the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem) burned for eight days on one day’s supply of oil. So every year, beginning on the 25th of Kislev, Jewish families all over the world light candles for eight days to remember this holiday of our freedom and God's miracle.

The Temple had fallen into enemy hands. They desecrated and defiled it. They polluted it with idols and sacrifices to false gods. They stopped Temple life. The Syrian conquerors endeavored to stamp out Judaism and the Jewish people by forbidding the teaching of Torah, the Jewish Scriptures, and by not permitting circumcision; or allowing the observance of the Sabbath. To continue to teach the children their Jewish faith the game of dreidal was invented. A four-sided top with Hebrew letters on each side was used. When the soldiers were near they played the game, when the soldiers left they taught the children. The game of dreidal is still played during Hanukah.

Since oil is prominent in the story many foods are fried in oil during Hanukah. One special food is latkes, potato or cheese pancakes, served with sour cream and applesauce for potato and jams and jellies for the cheese. See the reverse side for delicious recipes!

A nine branch menorah or candle holder is used. On the first day of Hanukkah, one candle is lit. On the second day two candles are lit, and so on until on the eighth day all eight are lit. The ninth candle is called the Shamos or “servant” candle. This is lit first and it gives its’ light to all the other candles. One explanation for lighting the candles this way is that the Shamos candle represents or symbolizes the Messiah and just as the Shamos gives physical light to the other candles so the Messiah gives spiritual light to his people. In Isaiah 53, the Messiah is called God's "Righteous servant." It is significant to note that Messiah Yeshua/Jesus observed this festival, also known as "The feast of Dedication" John 10:22-23. Yeshua also said, "I am the light of the world. He that follows me shall not walk in darkness but shall have the light of life" John 8:12.

We light the Shamos first, then say the blessing, then light the Hanukkah candles. Presents are given to the children each night. Usually money, dreidals (four sided tops), and candy are given, songs are sung, games are played, especially the dreidal game, and latkes are eaten.

The Jews under the leadership of the Maccabees were led to victory and recovered the Temple of God. It was Redeemed from their enemies. Then it was cleansed and Restored. After which it was Rededicated to God. The light of the Temple was Renewed, and Temple life was Revived.

God wants to redeem us, restore us, rededicate us, renew us, and revive us, to nourish us, and restore us to life, spiritual life. He wants us to be whole, vigorous, and lively. We are admonished to walk in the Spirit and to walk in the Light, Galatians 5:16, 25; 1 John 1:7. Let us seek God and we will find Him when we seek God with all of our heart.

This Hanukah let us pray that all Israel will see that Yeshua is the Messiah and the Light of the world.
Hanukkah means “Dedication” so it is called “The Feast of Dedication.” It is also called “The Feast of Lights.”
It refers to the time in history, when under the leadership of Judah Maccabee (Maccabee meaning, "hammer" or "sledgehammer" in recognition of his ferocity in battle) the Jewish people won their freedom from their Greek and Syrian oppressors. On the 25th of Kislev - December, 165 B.C., they cleansed and restored the Temple and rededicated it to God. Tradition tells us that only enough sacred oil for one day was found when they lit the Temple menorah. However, a great miracle happened there! The menorah (seven branched candle holder found in the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem) burned for eight days on one day’s supply of oil. So every year, beginning on the 25th of Kislev, Jewish families all over the world light candles for eight days to remember this holiday of our freedom and God's miracle.

The Temple had fallen into enemy hands. They desecrated and defiled it. They polluted it with idols and sacrifices to false gods. They stopped Temple life. The Syrian conquerors endeavored to stamp out Judaism and the Jewish people by forbidding the teaching of Torah, the Jewish Scriptures, and by not permitting circumcision; or allowing the observance of the Sabbath. To continue to teach the children their Jewish faith the game of dreidal was invented. A four-sided top with Hebrew letters on each side was used. When the soldiers were near they played the game, when the soldiers left they taught the children. The game of dreidal is still played during Hanukah.

Since oil is prominent in the story many foods are fried in oil during Hanukah. One special food is latkes, potato or cheese pancakes, served with sour cream and applesauce for potato and jams and jellies for the cheese. See the reverse side for delicious recipes!

A nine branch menorah or candle holder is used. On the first day of Hanukkah, one candle is lit. On the second day two candles are lit, and so on until on the eighth day all eight are lit. The ninth candle is called the Shamos or “servant” candle. This is lit first and it gives its’ light to all the other candles. One explanation for lighting the candles this way is that the Shamos candle represents or symbolizes the Messiah and just as the Shamos gives physical light to the other candles so the Messiah gives spiritual light to his people. In Isaiah 53, the Messiah is called God's "Righteous servant." It is significant to note that Messiah Yeshua/Jesus observed this festival, also known as "The feast of Dedication" John 10:22-23. Yeshua also said, "I am the light of the world. He that follows me shall not walk in darkness but shall have the light of life" John 8:12.

We light the Shamos first, then say the blessing, then light the Hanukkah candles. Presents are given to the children each night. Usually money, dreidals (four sided tops), and candy are given, songs are sung, games are played, especially the dreidal game, and latkes are eaten.

The Jews under the leadership of the Maccabees were led to victory and recovered the Temple of God. It was Redeemed from their enemies. Then it was cleansed and Restored. After which it was Rededicated to God. The light of the Temple was Renewed, and Temple life was Revived.

God wants to redeem us, restore us, rededicate us, renew us, and revive us, to nourish us, and restore us to life, spiritual life. He wants us to be whole, vigorous, and lively. We are admonished to walk in the Spirit and to walk in the Light, Galatians 5:16, 25; 1 John 1:7. Let us seek God and we will find Him when we seek God with all of our heart.

This Hanukkah let us pray that all Israel will see that Yeshua is the Messiah and the Light of the world.

Check out the website for our ministry: www.awakeoisrael.org - let your unbelieving Jewish friends know about this resource!

In the Name of our Messiah Jesus,

Abe Sandler



Hanukkah Recipes:

Cheese Latkes

1 lb cottage cheese (large curd if possible)
6 eggs
½ Cup sugar
pinch salt
½ tsp cinnamon
½ tsp vanilla
grated peel of ½ lemon
1 Cup flour

Combine in order given. Drop by Tablespoons into hot oil (I put about ½ inch oil in frying pan)
Fry until golden brown (turning once), they cook quickly). Serve with sour cream and jam (we use strawberry).


POTATO LATKES

2 lbs. potatoes (baking)
2 onions
2 eggs
½ + cup matzah meal (2 ½ oz.)
Salt and pepper

Don’t peel potatoes, just wash them.
Use food processor to mix potatoes, onions,
eggs (don’t make too mushy or watery). Put in
bowl and mix in Matza Meal.
Drop by large Tablespoons in hot oil. Fry until
Brown (turning once). Drain on paper towels.
Serve with sour cream and applesauce.
Makes about 20 large latkes.




Debbie Schermerhorn
Dec 18 2012 09:51 AM
Thank you for you post! My husband and I celebrate Chanukah as Christian believers. We use the time as a rededication of our minds and hearts since we are the "temples" of the Living God—Yeshua/Jesus the Messiah!

And thank you for the recipes, the cheese latkes sound interesting. My Sweet Potato Latkes recipe is very much like your's—only peel and wash the sweet potatoes and finely shred in food processor. No onions, but add 1/4 tsp. nutmeg instead. I use a very thin coating of olive oil on a griddle and keep them thin to cook thru.

Be blessed!
  • Report